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‘See, that’s my third person. That’s my bipolar shit [..] that’s my superpower, ain’t no disability, I am a superhero! I am a superhero!’, rapped the American rapper Kanye West on the song ‘Yikes’, from his 2018 album ‘Ye’.

Visual sources of the international year of disabled persons. Discussion of visual sources with Master students from the Public History course of the University of Amsterdam. These students are doing a public history project on the International Year of Disabled Persons (1981) and will highlight what they have found.

In 2020 vieren we 75 jaar bevrijding. In datzelfde jaar zijn in Den Haag de Invictus Games en in Tokio de Paralympische Spelen, allebei sportevenementen voor mensen met een handicap. Het lijkt toeval dat Tweede Wereldoorlog en gehandicaptensport zo bij elkaar komen, maar niets is minder waar.

The ERC-funded project Rethinking Disability was featured in the Fȇte de La Science which was held on 11 October 2019 at Sorbonne University in Paris. Rethinking Disability is one of the ERC projects which was selected to collaborate with ERcComics, an ambitious scheme funded by the H2020 Innovation programme [..]

On 2 December 2019, on the eve of International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the team of the ERC research project Rethinking Disability organizes a symposium in the International Institute for Social History, Amsterdam (IISG/IISH)

Call for blogposts: A Public Global History of the International Year of Disabled Persons (1981)

What form did these charity and fundraising campaigns for persons with disabilities take, at a time when the Nordic welfare states prospered? And what was so ambivalent about them that disability activists like Arne Skouen even threatened to take public authorities to court? A look at two such campaigns in the 1960s gives us some answers to these questions.

In Norway the early 1980s marked a period of upheaval as various minority groups protested for political recognition. Between 1979 and 1982 the Sámi, an indigenous people from the northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Russian Kola peninsula, tried to block the construction of a hydroelectric power plant at the river Alta in Northern Norway with mass demonstrations and hunger strikes.

This paper aims to put us in a better position to understand and evaluate the imperative to reduce suffering, not just as an abstract principle but in terms of the concrete social practices in which it gets instantiated and how they change over time.