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DisPLACE is een online platform met verhalen over leven met beperkingen vanuit de eigen ervaring, verteld op een manier die toegankelijk is voor iedereen. Deze verhalen zijn onbekend en zullen je uitdagen op een andere manier naar de samenleving en het verleden te kijken.

Monika Baar has been invited by the Netherlands-Flemish Institute in Cairo to give the Cleveringa lecture of 2018 on 26th of November. Her lecture is entitled ‘Historical Aspects on the Community Building, Integration and Quality of Life of People with Disabilities’.

On the 3rd of December 2017 and while the world was celebrating the International Day of Disability, The Egyptian parliament approved the bill of a new legislation that was described as a ‘historic law’ because it  would grant unprecedented facilitations, rights and more empowerment to the persons with disabilities (PWD) in the country.

Criptic identities: historicizing the identity formation of persons with disabilities across the globe

For the International Convention of Asian Scholars (ICAS 11, 16-19 July 2019, Leiden The Netherlands) we aim to organize a panel in which we explore the question how postcolonial thought could further inspire the writing of disability histories in Asia.

The Rethinking Disability team invites all Leiden based scholars working on disability for a ‘Leiden disability studies lunch’! This lunch will take place on Wednesday 13 June 12.30-13.30 in the conference room of the Huizinga building, Doelensteeg 16 in Leiden.

The previous post of this blog series listed some of the points of critique that have been formulated by various scholars on the social model of disability. This account was by no means exhaustive, but it does serve to illustrate that in a changed intellectual context new limits of the social model have surfaced.

The social model of disability has been very successful within British and American disability studies as well as outside the academy. It has influenced national and international policies on disability in governmental and non-governmental organizations. Yet, notwithstanding these successes, the social model has faced various forms of critique in the last two decades.

The topic of this three-part blog series is a concept that seems quite ubiquitous in the field of disability studies: the social model of disability. Drawing from existing literature, in this this first post I will provide a (very) brief introduction of the social model of disability and its (British) origins.